Future Tenses and New Year's Resolutions

This is just an idea I had to use New Year’s resolutions to teach the future tense. That in and of itself is probably nothing new. However one major issue that many students have with talking about the future in English is distinguishing between when we use “going to do”, when we use “will do” and when we use present continuous, “I am doing”. So here’s a way to help them understand the difference. Of course, we should be careful not to present these distinctions as hard and fast rules. In actual practice, the three modes are interchangeable or come down to subjective differences. Often comprehension is the most important point. They need to understand that when someone says, “Italy is going to win the World Cup,” it means the speaker has some reason to believe this is so. When someone says, “Italy will win,” it more likely means the speaker wants Italy to win.

Warm Up: Presentation

Explain briefly, if necessary, the idea of New Year’s resolutions–plans that we make to improve ourselves in the upcoming year. Then write three New Year’s resolutions on the board. These may or may not be your real resolutions. Do make sure that at least one of them uses “will” and at least one uses “am going to”.

For example:

  1. I will quit smoking.
  2. I am going to be a better teacher.
  3. I will be a kinder person.

Point out that the second resolution has a different grammar form. Ask why that might be. If you don’t elicit it, then explain that you used “am going to be” because you have already taken steps toward this goal and you feel that it is achievable. You got some teaching books for Christmas, and you have been evaluating your old lessons. So there is some reason to believe that you are going to be a better teacher next year.

Explain that quitting smoking is very difficult. So while you want to achieve that goal, you don’t necessarily believe it will happen. And you haven’t really prepared for it at all. So there’s no reason now to believe that you will quit smoking, but you really want to, and you are going to try.

This lesson has now moved to my Teacher’s Pay Teacher store. You can preview, purchase, and download New Year’s Resolutions and the Future Tense Lesson Plan there. It includes controlled practice, a verb tense worksheet, and a fun worksheet for students to write their own resolutions on with complete Teacher’s Notes and Extension Ideas. So check it out!

New Year's Resolutions and the Future

This is just an idea I had to use New Year’s resolutions to teach the future tense. That in and of itself is probably nothing new. However one major issue that many students have with talking about the future in English is distinguishing between when we use “going to do”, when we use “will do” and when we use present continuous, “I am doing”. So here’s a way to help them understand the difference. Of course, we should be careful not to present these distinctions as hard and fast rules. In actual practice, the three modes are interchangeable or come down to subjective differences. Often comprehension is the most important point. They need to understand that when someone says, “Italy is going to win the World Cup,” it means the speaker has some reason to believe this is so. When someone says, “Italy will win,” it more likely means the speaker wants Italy to win.

New Year’s Resolutions and the Future

Food and Holidays

Food and Holidays is a popular topic that almost all your students will have something to say about!
Food and Holidays Lesson Plan

This is a pretty simple discussion lesson plan to get students talking about food from different perspectives. It can be used as part of a lesson, or supplemented with activities, games, and so on. I found this was a good lesson to do when I was still getting to know students because it is a pretty universal topic and as a foreigner in a foreign country, students love telling me about their traditional food. I talk about US foods and holidays here because I am American but obviously it could be used to talk about your own native cuisine instead. If you are American, it’s a great way to introduce Thanksgiving or other traditional holidays that revolve around food!

Objectives

  • To promote fluency and discussion
  • To practice vocabulary related to food, tastes and ingredients
  • To encourage students to describe in detail
  • To talk about holidays and traditions and customs related to food

Materials

  • Discussion Questions
  • Food Adjective Cloze or Brainstorm Worksheet
  • Pictures of typical American food (or food from your culture)

To prepare, put pictures of some typical American food on the board. For example:

but without the captions. Ask students to guess what these typical foods are. Then explain that in the US we also eat a lot of international foods. See if they can guess where these typical “American” foods come from.

Now ask students to name some of their national foods. Prompt them to describe the food in detail: what it is made out of, how it is made, how it is eaten, what it looks like, what it tastes like, etc. If you are familiar with their national cuisine you can prompt them. If you are not familiar, you can use your ignorance to elicit details. You can also get into what international foods have been absorbed into their culture and are now typical foods.

This activity has been moved to my Teachers Pay Teachers Store. If you like this sample, you can purchase and download the full Food and Holidays Lesson Plan there.

And check out all my Thanksgiving lesson plans and activities here.