A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Lesson Plan

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving is a great introduction to Thanksgiving particularly for EFL students who don’t know a lot about the holiday.

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Lesson PlanObjectives

  • Teach about the American holiday of Thanksgiving
  • Discuss traditions and the meaning of Thanksgiving
  • Practice understanding videos

Materials

  • Video Summary [for the teacher]
  • Video Comprehension Questions
  • Discussion Questions
  • Extension Ideas
  • Answer Keys
  • Video of A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving

Warm up

Write on the board: “How we Celebrate”, “History”,”Meaning”,”Related Events”. Ask students what they know about Thanksgiving. Write their contributions in the appropriate categories.

Alternate Procedure Have students come to the board and write their own ideas on the board where they think they fit.

Alternate Procedure Give students 2 minutes to write down whatever comes to mind when they think of Thanksgiving. Then elicit one suggestion at a time from different students and put them on the board.

The goal of this exercise is to elicit vocabulary and get students thinking about Thanksgiving. This will also generate questions and get them articulating what they want to know. On the flip side, foreign students may be surprised at how much they do know about this American holiday.

Introduce the Video: Tell students that you are going to show a video about a funny Thanksgiving. Ask if they know who Charlie Brown is. Spend some time discussing the characters and their personality types. It’s helpful if students understand that Charlie Brown is rather shy and unsure of himself, Peppermint Patty is very assertive, and Snoopy is very creative but sometimes silly. However, they will quickly grasp these details as the film starts.

Then hand out the Video Comprehension Questions and tell students to answer the questions as they watch.

This activity has been moved to my Teachers Pay Teachers Store. If you like this sample, you can purchase and download the full A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Lesson Plan there. Check out all my Thanksgiving lesson plans and activities here.

Students Love to Talk About Food!

The Food lesson plan is one that goes over very well with students. It’s accessible to everyone. Beginners can handle describing their native dishes simply and you can push more advanced learners to describe detailed recipes. The lesson also has a multicultural aspect as the teacher can introduce common foods from his/her home country. Finally, the plan moves on to discussing holiday meals, which means this lesson can be used for any holiday, especially holidays that have associations with special foods: Christmas, New Years, May Day, Nauryz, Easter, Ramadan, Passover.

Or use it in conjunction with At the Restaurant to discuss restaurants and eating out.

Food and Holidays

Food and Holidays is a popular topic that almost all your students will have something to say about!
Food and Holidays Lesson Plan

This is a pretty simple discussion lesson plan to get students talking about food from different perspectives. It can be used as part of a lesson, or supplemented with activities, games, and so on. I found this was a good lesson to do when I was still getting to know students because it is a pretty universal topic and as a foreigner in a foreign country, students love telling me about their traditional food. I talk about US foods and holidays here because I am American but obviously it could be used to talk about your own native cuisine instead. If you are American, it’s a great way to introduce Thanksgiving or other traditional holidays that revolve around food!

Objectives

  • To promote fluency and discussion
  • To practice vocabulary related to food, tastes and ingredients
  • To encourage students to describe in detail
  • To talk about holidays and traditions and customs related to food

Materials

  • Discussion Questions
  • Food Adjective Cloze or Brainstorm Worksheet
  • Pictures of typical American food (or food from your culture)

To prepare, put pictures of some typical American food on the board. For example:

but without the captions. Ask students to guess what these typical foods are. Then explain that in the US we also eat a lot of international foods. See if they can guess where these typical “American” foods come from.

Now ask students to name some of their national foods. Prompt them to describe the food in detail: what it is made out of, how it is made, how it is eaten, what it looks like, what it tastes like, etc. If you are familiar with their national cuisine you can prompt them. If you are not familiar, you can use your ignorance to elicit details. You can also get into what international foods have been absorbed into their culture and are now typical foods.

This activity has been moved to my Teachers Pay Teachers Store. If you like this sample, you can purchase and download the full Food and Holidays Lesson Plan there.

And check out all my Thanksgiving lesson plans and activities here.